Church of Pensacola
Church of Pensacola

 

And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit. You shall have them for food."

Genesis 1:29 (ESV)

 

And on the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for food. Their leaves will not wither, nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for food, and their leaves for healing.”

Ezekiel 47:12 (ESV)

Research shows that sage can help preserve or enhance memory and brain functions

Article from Natural News by P. Simard

August 20, 2013

 

Sage, scientifically known as Salvia officinalis, comes from the latin word salvere which basically means to be saved. During the 10th century, Arab physicians thought sage promoted immortality, while in the 14th century, Europeans would use it to protect themselves from witchcraft. Although these old beliefs may seem like pure fantasy to most, it's not surprising that sage was actually named herb of the year by the International Herb Association back in 2001. Sage comes from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and has been utilized for thousands of years. This great medicinal herb is from the mint (Labiatae) family and, just like rosemary, it contains a variety of volatile oils, flavonoids and phenolic acids.
 
This well regarded medicinal herb definitely has incredible health benefits if only taking into account its strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, although the most interesting aspect about this wonderful herb seems to be the research that has led specialists to believe it could be a major player in preserving or optimizing brain functions. Some of the other specific properties that are well recognized and associated to the use of sage include reducing excessive perspiration and lowering blood sugar levels in diabetics.

 

Do you know someone afflicted by memory loss or Alzheimer's disease ? If so, have you ever considered sage to help their condition ?

 

In June 2003, the journal, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, published some quite revealing results from research done with sage. A study was conducted in order to verify sage's true potential as a memory enhancer. The scientists had 45 adults on hand for two separate trials. Some of the individuals were given a placebo while others had essential oil extracts made of sage, with doses varying between 50 to 150 microls. Memory tests were performed by the participants, 1 to 6 hours following the intakes. In each trial, even the smallest amounts of sage were enough for participants to notably improve their memory.
 
During the September 2003 British Pharmaceutical Conference in Harrogate, Professor Peter Houghton presented compelling information about research that showed how salvia miltiorrhiza or Chinese sage could possibly help treat Alzheimer's disease, or at the very least, be an interesting alternative to the usual pharmaceutical drugs. Dr. Houghton elaborated on how sage's active compounds, similar to those employed in prescribed drugs, were capable of somewhat neutralizing Alzheimer's disease.

In the experiment, scientists discovered that certain isolated compounds from a sage extract were found to be acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitors. Generally, Alzheimer's disease displays an increase of AchE that leads to loss of memory by depleting the cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons of the brain. By stopping any increase in AchE, sage provides a serious therapeutic option instead of the conventional pharmaceutical AchE inhibitors.

 

.....In other hopeful news about Alzheimer's, the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) is currently studying herbal preparations made from the leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree. In preliminary reports, IQWiG scientists have found the natural treatments appear to improve symptoms of the disease, including the ability of some AD patients to regain the ability to perform daily tasks. 

Cinnamon may hold the key to Alzheimer`s disease prevention and treatment

Article from Natural News by John Philip

Saturday, August 06, 2011

 

Researchers from Tel Aviv University report in the PLoS ONE journal that the common spice cinnamon found in many kitchen pantries around the world may hold a crucial key to preventing Alzheimer`s disease.

 

Alzheimer`s disease cases are growing at an exponential pace, currently affecting one in eight people over the age of 65. Cutting edge research posits that the devastating illness is in part the result of metabolic disruption in the brain and has been coined `Type III diabetes` as it disrupts insulin levels in brain tissue. An extract found in cinnamon  bark, called CEppt, has been shown to inhibit the development and progression of the disease in this latest study.
 
Researchers from the Department of Zoology at Tel Aviv University found that potent extracts from cinnamon bark inhibit the toxic amyloid polypeptide oligomers and fibrils that have been found in Alzheimer`s brain plaque formations. The healing power of cinnamon has been known since biblical times as high priests used the spice to protect against infectious disease. Antiviral properties have been confirmed by modern research and have prompted studies to further examine extracts from the spice that may stop the development of Alzheimer`s disease.
 
Scientists have isolated the CEppt active compound found in cinnamon bark and created an aqueous solution for use in research experiments. The solution was fed to mice genetically altered to develop an aggressive form of Alzheimer`s disease. After a period of four months, researchers found that development of the disease had been slowed dramatically and activity levels and longevity were comparable to a control group of healthy mice.
 
In addition to the disease regression findings, researchers determined that the cinnamon extract was found to break up the classic amyloid protein clusters in test tube experiments. Lead researcher Professor Michael Ovadia believes this indicates that CEppt is not only important to inhibit the development and progression of Alzheimer`s disease, but this may also help to break up existing tangles once they have formed.
 
Many natural substances including resveratrol, curcumin and blueberries have shown promise in preventing this devastating form of dementia, but this therapy may reverse the disease once a diagnosis has been presented. Professor Ovadia commented on the results of this research "The discovery is extremely exciting. While there are companies developing synthetic AD inhibiting substances, our extract would not be a drug with side effects, but a safe, natural substance that human beings have been consuming for millennia."
 
Scientists conducting this study did not publish the amount of cinnamon used to produce their results. Nutrition experts recommend using cinnamon liberally sprinkled on food daily or supplementing with 500 mg of cinnamon bark extract taken daily with meals. Cinnamon is rapidly becoming a natural compound that may hold the key to prevent and treat Alzheimer`s disease.

 

 

 

Vitamin D3 and curcumin synergistically clear brain tangles to help prevent Alzheimer's dementia

Article from Natural News by: John Phillip

Friday, March 23, 2012

 

New diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease cases continue to mount at an unprecedented rate, threatening both the lives of those suffering from this dreaded illness and the health care system itself, as billions are spent to care for the millions suffering from this lifestyle-mediated disease. New hope is now offered by scientists from the University of California publishing in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, as they have identified the specific intracellular mechanism regulated by vitamin D3 that may help the body clear the brain of amyloid beta.
 
There has been scant evidence in the past to show that vitamin D and the curry-derived compound, curcumin help to prevent Alzheimer's dementia. Researchers now provide solid research-based science to explain the precise pathway used by these two natural substances to help stimulate the immune system to activate key genes involved in clearing the amyloid-beta protein. Chief study author, Dr. Milan Fiala noted "This new study helped clarify the key mechanisms involved, which will help us better understand the usefulness of vitamin D3 and curcumin as possible therapies for Alzheimer's disease." Prior research has suggested a synergistic effect between the two compounds and clearance of deadly protein tangles, but no action pathway has ever been postulated until now.

 

Vitamin D3 and curcumin work together to clear deadly brain plaques. To test their hypothesis, scientists took blood samples from a group of currently diagnosed Alzheimer's disease patients and a control group of healthy volunteers. They then isolated the immune-stimulating component of the white blood cells called macrophages. These special cells are known to target and eliminate amyloid fibrils and other waste products that accumulate in the brain before they manifest into detectable disease conditions.
 
Researchers then incubated some of the extracted immune cells for a 24-hour period in a solution containing the active form of vitamin D3 (1a, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3). Other cells were exposed to a standardized curcumin extract. Past studies have shown that there are two types of macrophages, Type I and Type II that independently perform different functions, yet must work together to effectively remove amyloid protein in the brain. The scientists found that Type I macrophage activity is greatly enhanced with optimal saturation of vitamin D3, and Type II immune cells are supported by the presence of curcumin. Researchers found that the action of both Type I and II macrophages are greatly enhanced by the synergistic application of vitamin D3 and curcumin together. Dr. Fiala concluded "Our findings demonstrate that active forms of vitamin D3 (and curcumin) may be an important regulator of immune activities of macrophages in helping to clear amyloid plaques."
 
Proof positive now exists to support maintaining optimal blood saturation levels (50 to 70 ng/mL) of vitamin D as measured using the simple and inexpensive 25(OH)D test. Most people will need to supplement with 5,000 to 7,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day or rely on sun exposure to obtain ideal levels. Adding curcumin to your regular diet using natural curry-enriched foods or supplementing (300 to 500 mg per day standardized to 95 percent total curcuminoids) will provide a synergistic effect shown to help clear brain tangles and prevent Alzheimer's dementia.

 

Sheryl Waters at NaturalNews writes:  

 

Anyone who has had to care for an elderly friend or relative that suffers from Alzheimer`s will know how debilitating and upsetting the disease can be. Alzheimer`s attacks the brain cells and disrupts the messages that travel between them. This results in impaired memory as well as strange and unsettling behavior. The early signs of Alzheimer`s may not be very noticeable. A poor short term memory may be the only sign, but as the disease progresses long term memories may also disappear. There are thought to be nearly 5 million people that suffer from the disease in the USA alone. Most of who take lots of medication to try and stabilize the disease and to combat the knock on effects such as depression and insomnia. But recent research in to the treatment and prevention of the disease is pointing in a far more natural direction.

India has one the lowest numbers of people suffering with Alzheimer`s in the world. In fact just 1% of Indians over 65 suffers from the disease while that number is more like 10% in America. For years scientists and Doctors had struggled to understand exactly why this is, but research in to the medical properties of a well known spice may just have provided the answer. Early research in to Turmeric was based totally around the spice's amazing ability to stop the growth of cancerous cells. But as the spice was investigated further researchers found that it may also prevent the progression of Alzheimer`s.

The active ingredient in tunmeric that makes it such a great medical tool is called curcumin. Curcumin has been found to be a powerful anti-inflammatory and has long been used in China and India to help cure a range of problems from flatulence and menstrual difficulties to bloody urine and toothache. In a study published in the Italian Journal of Biochemistry it was reported that curcumin may also trigger the brain tissue to produce the potent antioxidant bilirubin, which protects the brain against oxidative (free radical) injury. It is this oxidative degenerative injury that is thought to be the main culprit behind Alzheimer`s disease. This goes towards explaining why Alzheimer`s levels are so low in India as turmeric is one of the main spices used in Indian cooking.

This research is by no means pointing towards a cure for the disease, but it may go a long way to helping prevent thousands if not millions of sufferers from going through the hell that can be Alzheimer`s.
http://www.alzheimers.org.au/conten...
http://www.life-enhancement.com/art...
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?...

Vitamin D, Curcumin May Help Clear Amyloid Plaques Found In Alzheimer's Disease

Article from ScienceDaily, July 16, 2009

 

UCLA scientists and colleagues from UC Riverside and the Human BioMolecular Research Institute have found that a form of vitamin D, together with a chemical found in turmeric spice called curcumin, may help stimulate the immune system to clear the brain of amyloid beta, which forms the plaques considered the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

 

The early research findings, which appear in the July issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, may lead to new approaches in preventing and treating Alzheimer's by utilizing the property of vitamin D3 — a form of vitamin D — both alone and together with natural or synthetic curcumin to boost the immune system in protecting the brain against amyloid beta.

 

Vitamin D3 is an essential nutrient for bone and immune system health; its main source is sunshine, and it is synthesized through the skin. Deficiencies may occur during winter months or in those who spend a lot of time indoors, such as Alzheimer's patients. "We hope that vitamin D3 and curcumin, both naturally occurring nutrients, may offer new preventive and treatment possibilities for Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Milan Fiala, study author and a researcher at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System.

 

Using blood samples from nine Alzheimer's patients, one patient with mild cognitive impairment and three healthy control subjects, scientists isolated monocyte cells, which transform into macrophages that act as the immune system's clean-up crew, traveling through the brain and body and gobbling up waste products, including amyloid beta. Researchers incubated the macrophages with amyloid beta, vitamin D3 and natural or synthetic curcumin.

 

The synthetic curcuminoid compounds were developed in the laboratory of John Cashman at the Human BioMolecular Research Institute, a nonprofit institute dedicated to research on diseases of the human brain.Researchers found that naturally occurring curcumin was not readily absorbed, that it tended to break down quickly before it could be utilized and that its potency level was low, making it less effective than the new synthetic curcuminoids. "We think some of the novel synthetic compounds will get around the shortcomings of curcumin and improve the therapeutic efficacy," Cashman said.

 

The team discovered that curcuminoids enhanced the surface binding of amyloid beta to macrophages and that vitamin D strongly stimulated the uptake and absorption of amyloid beta in macrophages in a majority of patients. Previous research by the team demonstrated that the immune genes MGAT III and TLR-3 are associated with the immune system's ability to better ingest amyloid beta. In this earlier work, Fiala noted, it was shown that there are two types of Alzheimer's patients: Type 1 patients, who respond positively to curcuminoids, and Type II patients, who do not. "Since vitamin D and curcumin work differently with the immune system, we may find that a combination of the two or each used alone may be more effective — depending on the individual patient," he said.

 

Fiala noted that this is early laboratory research and that no dosage of vitamin D or curcumin can be recommended at this point. Larger vitamin D and curcumin studies with more patients are planned.

 

The study was funded by the Human BioMolecular Research Institute, the Alzheimer's Association and MP Biomedicals LLC, a global life sciences and diagnostics company dedicated to Alzheimer's disease research. Fiala is a consultant for MP Biomedicals and also served in the company's speakers bureau.

 

Additional study authors include Ava Masoumi, Ben Goldenson, Hripsime Avagyan, Justin Zaghi, Michelle Mahanian, Martin Hewison, Araceli Espinosa-Jeffrey and Phillip T. Liu, of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Senait Ghirami, Ken Abel, Xuying Zheng and John Cashman, of the Human BioMolecular Research Institute; and Mathew Mizwicki, of the department of biochemistry at UC Riverside.

Could Eating This Simple Black Seed Prevent Alzheimer's Disease?

Article from Greenmedinfo.com by Sayer Ji, founder  

July 13th 2013

 

A new study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology reveals that the seeds of Nigella sativa, commonly known as "black seed," may provide an ideal nutritional supplement for preventing or slowing the progression of Alzheimer disease. 

 

Researchers divided forty elderly volunteers into a treatment group receiving 500 mg capsules of Nigella Sativia twice daily for nine weeks and a placebo group. Subjects were assessed for neuropsychological state and safety profile twice before treatment and after nine weeks. The trial resulted in significant improvements in memory, attention and cognition without any measurable changes in any biochemical markers of cardiac, liver, or kidney function during the nine-week study period.

 

The researchers also noted that beyond its neuroprotective properties Nigella Sativa also has kidney protective, lung protective, cardioprotective and liver protective properties. It is remarkable that a thousand years ago the Persian scholar Ibn Sīnā described Nigella sativia in his Canon of Medicine for their enlivening and tonifying effects as follows: 'it stimulates the body's energy and helps recovery from fatigue and dispiritedness. It appears that science is only now catching up to the wisdom of the ancients, which in the case of Black Seed, was known as 'The Remedy for Everything But Death.'

Our own review of the scientific literature on the US National Library of Medicine reveals this remarkable seed's experimentally confirmed benefits articulated through 20 distinct physiological actions:

 

Analgesic (Pain-Killing)

Anti-Bacterial

Anti-Inflammatory

Anti-Ulcer

Anti-Cholinergic

Anti-Fungal

Ant-Hypertensive

Antioxidant

Antispasmodic

Antiviral

Bronchodilator

Gluconeogenesis Inhibitor (Anti-Diabetic)

Hepatoprotective (Liver Protecting)

Hypotensive

Insulin Sensitizing

Interferon Inducer

Leukotriene Antagonist

Renoprotective (Kidney Protecting)

Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitor

 

Black seed, like turmeric, ginger, pepper, oregano, and cinnamon, is commonly used as both a food and medicine in traditional cultures. As research continues to accumulate confirming ancient dietary compounds in preventing and treating disease, a genuine paradigm shift within conventional medicine is imminent. When safe, affordable and easily accessible spices, herbs and food concentrates produce therapeutic effects often superior to the drugs we are increasingly encouraged to look to the farm before the pharmacy.

B vitamins proven to slow progression of dementia, Alzheimer's

Article from Natural news by  David Gutierrez

Sunday, January 16, 2011 by:
  
Mega-doses of B vitamins may significantly slow brain shrinkage and slow the progression of dementia, according to a study conducted by researchers from Oxford University and published in the journal PLoS One. "This is a very dramatic and striking result," lead researcher David Smith said. "It's much more than we could have predicted." "It is our hope that this simple and safe treatment will delay development of Alzheimer's in many people who suffer from mild memory problems."

 

Researchers assigned 168 people suffering from mild cognitive impairment to take either a placebo or a pill containing 15 times the recommended daily dose of vitamin B6, four times the recommended dose of B9 and 300 times the recommended dose of B12. These vitamins are known to lower levels of the amino acid homocysteine, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease. Approximately 50 percent of people who suffer from mild cognitive impairment eventually develop a more severe form of dementia. 
 
On average, the brains of patients taking the vitamins shrank at half the rate of those taking a placebo. The benefit was most pronounced in patients whose homocysteine levels were high at the start of the study. An estimated 35 million people around the world suffer from dementia, including 26.6 million with Alzheimer's disease. In the United States, Alzheimer's rates are estimated at 1.2 percent of the general population, climbing to as high as 42 percent of those older than 84. "Clearly, in the Western World, dementia is not a rare problem," write doctors Abram Hoffer and Harold D. Foster in Feel Better, Live Longer with Vitamin B-3. "Indeed, R. Katzman and colleagues have argued that in people more than 75 years of age, new cases of dementia occur as frequently as myocardial infarction and twice as often as stroke."
 
The authors note that Hoffman has been prescribing vitamin B3 to patients who show preliminary signs of age-related cognitive impairment since 1955.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/031022_dementia_B_vitamins.html#ixzz1BEKtX2wQ

http://www.naturalnews.com/031022_dementia_B_vitamins.html#ixzz1BEKy1ojC

 

Vitamin B is revolutionary new weapon against Alzheimer's Disease

Article from the Telegraph newspaper (UK) by Richard Alleyne, Science Correspondent

5:00AM BST 09 Sep 2010

 

Vitamin B tablets could slow and even halt the devastating march of Alzheimer's Disease in the elderly, a breakthrough British study suggests. The research showed that large doses of the supplement could halve the rate of brain shrinkage – a physical symptom associated memory loss and dementia in the elderly. The effects were so dramatic that the scientists behind the work believe it could revolutionise the treatment of the disease.

 

Brain shrinkage or atrophy is a natural part of ageing but it is known to be accelerated in people with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) – a kind of memory loss and forgetfulness – and Alzheimer's. Scientists at the University of Oxford conducted a trial on 168 people and found that taking high doses of three vitamin B supplements every day reduced brain shrinkage associated with dementia by up to 53 per cent.

 

They said the results were so strong that it should open up a debate as to whether the tablets should be prescribed to everyone with MCI – half of whom develop Alzheimer's disease. MCI affects 16 per cent of people over 70 – 1.5 million people in the UK.

 

Professor David Smith, a pharmacologist who co-authored the study, said the results were "immensely promising". "It is a very simple solution: you give someone some vitamins and you protect the brain," he said. "This is the first trial that has shown a glimmer of hope and success. It is the first one of its kind that has worked so clearly. I think it will change the whole direction of Alzheimer's research. "500 people a day develop Alzheimer's in the UK. If we can cut that down by just 10 per cent it will have a big impact. I personally believe that it will."

 

The research, published in the journal Public Library of Science ONE, is controversial because it defies current scientific dogma about the way to tackle Alzheimer's. It suggests simply taking vitamins can achieve results that have so far evaded pharmaceutical companies, despite millions of pounds being spent on experimental dementia drugs.

 

The brain naturally shrinks in volume as we get older and when you get to 60, it is shrinking by as much as half a per cent a year. But in those with MCI it is accelerates to one per cent a year and in Alzheimer's Disease by 2.5 per cent a year. This is accompanied by severe memory problems, slower thoughts and confusion.

 

Current research centres around tackling so-called tangles in the brain which are thought to "silt up" the brain's thought processes. The team at the University of Oxford set out in a new direction – targeting the abnormal physical shrinkage of the brain. They knew that a substance called homocysteine, an amino acid found in the blood, was associated with this shrinkage.

 

Elderly people with higher levels of homocysteine, had higher levels of brain shrinkage. They also knew that vitamin B regulated levels of homocysteine and that the more vitamin B in the blood, the lower the levels of the harmful amino acid.

 

The researchers used an advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to study brain shrinkage in 168 volunteers over the age of 70 with diagnosed MCI. Over a period of two years, half were given a daily tablet containing high doses of the B vitamins folic acid, B6 and B12. The rest received a "dummy" placebo pill with no active ingredients.

 

At the end of the trial the effects of the vitamin treatment were found to be dramatic, and most pronounced in participants who started out with the highest rates of brain shrinkage. On average, taking B vitamins slowed the rate of brain atrophy by 30 per cent, and in many cases reductions was as high as 53 per cent were seen.

 

Prof Smith said: "This is a very striking, dramatic result. It's much more than we could have predicted. "It is our hope that this simple and safe treatment will delay the development of Alzheimer's disease in many people who suffer from mild memory problems." Although the trial was not designed to measure thinking ability, the researchers found that individuals with the lowest rates of shrinkage had the highest mental test scores.

 

Prof Smith said it was still early to say exactly how vitamin B worked. "The treatment lowers homocysteine, lower homocysteine reduces brain shrinkage and that reduces cognitive decline," he said.

 

The scientists stress that the doses of B vitamins used in the trial are much higher than would be obtained from diets and additives or normal health supplements. The "TrioBe Plus" pills, prescribed under medical supervision in Sweden but not available in the UK, contain around 300 times the recommended daily intake of B12 and four times recommended folate levels.

 

However it is possible to copy the dose by buying three separate supplements from health food shops in Britain for as little as 10 pence a day. The long-term effects of taking big doses of the vitamins were not known, and there was some evidence that high folic acid intake could be linked to cancer, he said.

 

While Prof Smith said anybody thinking of taking them should consult their doctor first, he personally felt they would be effective. He said: "These are big doses. Should we take it? The person must be worried about their memory and then I would recommend going to their doctor first. But if I had MCI I would take it."

 

Professor Helga Refsum, his co-author at University of Oslo who is a visiting academic at Oxford, said more trials were needed but the evidence was strong. "As a scientist I am not happy with just one trial and there will be a large debate. But as a clinician sitting in front of a patient I would say vitamin B supplements are fairly safe, they are not expensive and what we have found here is extremely convincing. It is very difficult to argue against its use."

 

The study was cautiously welcomed by other scientists although they said more studies were needed to back up the findings. Rebecca Wood, chief executive of the Alzheimer's Research Trust, which co-funded the study, said: "These are very important results, with B vitamins now showing a prospect of protecting some people from Alzheimer's in old age. "The strong findings must inspire an expanded trial to follow people expected to develop Alzheimer's, and we hope for further success.

 

Chris Kennard, chair of the Medical Research Council's Neurosciences and Mental Health Board, which also provided funding, said: "The findings are very encouraging and we look forward to further research that is needed in order to test whether B vitamins can be recommended as a suitable treatment."

 

Paul Matthews, Professor of Clinical Neurology, Imperial College, London said: "This well-conducted study adds substantial new data to previous information suggesting that dietary B vitamins could have beneficial effects on neurodegeneration with ageing." A spokesman for the Alzheimer’s Society said:"This is an interesting study which could change the lives of thousands of people at risk of dementia. "However, previous studies looking at B vitamins have been very disappointing and we wouldn’t want to raise people’s expectations yet, as we have not specifically seen any benefits in preventing the onset of the symptoms of dementia."

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/7989889/Vitamin-B-is-revolutionary-new-weapon-against-Alzheimers-Disease.html

Yes, you can prevent Alzheimer's with specific nutrients, say scientists

Article from Natural News by  S. L. Baker, features writer

December 27, 2011

 

With an aging population and no cure on the horizon for memory and life-robbing Alzheimer's disease (AD), it's hard not to fear this 6th leading cause of death in the US -- especially if you know this nightmarish form of dementia runs in your family and you could be at increased risk for AD. What's more, mention Alzheimer's to mainstream doctors and they are usually quick to point out there's no cure, no prevention, and the only treatments are expensive drugs that work for a while, if at all, to diminish symptoms. Fortunately, that's not the whole truth. As NaturalNews has reported previously, researchers are uncovering specific natural strategies that appear to prevent and treat the disease Big Pharma has failed so miserably in curing(http://www.naturalnews.com/027954_n...). Now there's another promising development, a study in elderly people shows specific nutrients may prevent Alzheimer's.

According to new research just published in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, those who eat foods rich in several vitamins and in omega 3 fatty acids are far less likely to have the brain shrinkage associated with Alzheimer's disease than people whose diets are not high in those nutrients. What's more, people who eat foods loaded with omega 3 fatty acids (found in cold water fish like salmon and certain plant sources, including walnuts) and in vitamins C, D, E and the vitamin B (from fruits and vegetables) also have sharper cognitive abilities. The bottom line is that seniors who consume plenty of B,C and E vitamins as well as omega 3s score far better on mental thinking tests than people with diets low in those nutrients.
 
So what happens to people who eat the typical American diet of nutritionally deficit junk and fast foods? They may literally be killing their brains and bringing on Alzheimer's disease. The new study showed that people with diets high in trans fats -- which are found in packaged, fast, fried and frozen food, and margarine spreads -- were more likely to have shrinking brain tissue that's linked to AD. They also scored lower on thinking skills and memory tests than people with diets low in trans fats.

The remarkable health benefits of shilajit

Article from Natural News by Dr. David Jockers

October 26, 2013

 

Shilajit is an Indian Sanskrit word that means "rock-invincible." It was a sacred rock in the Aryuvedic traditions and renowned for its remarkable health benefits. It is a rock-like substance that is found in mountainous regions in Asia. This material has been found to have great detoxification and energy-producing health benefits.

 

Shilajit is a sticky, tar-like resin substance that oozes out of mountainous regions in the summer when it is heated by the sun. It is formed over centuries by the decomposition of plants and the activity of unique microrganisms such as Euphorbia royleana and Trifolium repens. Shilajit takes centuries to form, and scientists consider it a millenary product of nature.

 

Cultural uses for shilajit:

 

Shilajit is traditionally consumed with fermented raw milk by people in Nepal, Northern India and Pakistan. These are the Hunzan and Sherpan regions, where people are renowned for extremely old age and great health. They have remarkable mental function as they age compared to Western countries and rarely ever have age-related disease in these regions. Depending upon the region and culture of the world where it is found, shilajit takes on several names. In the Caucasas mountains, the variations are slightly different, and it is commonly called mumijo. Western regions have called it asphaltum (similar to asphalt) and mineral wax.

 

Nutrient components of shilajit:

 

Shilajit is a phytocomplex that contains over 85 minerals in their ionic form and triterpenes, selenium, phospholipids, humic acid and fulvic acid. These compounds have strong antioxidant properties, while the minerals help give shilajit an energy-enhancing effect. Most shilajit compounds contain between 60-80% fulvic acid, and the greater the content of fulvic acid, the more anti-aging properties the compound contains. Fulvic acid is water-soluble, moves through the system quickly and acts as a potent antioxidant. Recent studies have shown that the typical Oxygen Radical Absorbency Capacity (ORAC) of shilajit found in the Andes mountains of Chile was between 50 and 500 Trolox units/g of material. This is significantly higher than many fruits that are touted for their antioxidant capacity, such as noni and blueberries.

 

Health benefits of shilajit:

 

Shilajit has shown considerable potential in preventing self-aggregation of pathological filaments in the brain. This plays an important role in age-related mental decline and Alzheimer's disease development. Shilajit has also been used to improve symptoms involved with urinary tract disorders, jaundice, digestive problems, enlarged spleen, epilepsy, anxiety, chronic bronchitis and anemia.

 

Shilajit is an ionic mineral catalyst:

 

Shilajit promotes the movement of minerals into muscle, tissue and bone. Some of the translations of this Aryuvedic mineral-herb translate as the "conqueror of mountains and destroyer of weakness." It was thought to be able to conquer any sickness and disease process with the proper dosages at the proper times. It is considered an adptogenic substance that helps people adapt to environmental stressors more effectively. Due to its ionic component and ability to galvanize minerals, it is very helpful for kidney stones, gall stones, edema and swelling. It also helps prevent ulcers, reduces inflammation, improves blood sugar signaling, has antimicrobial properties and enhances memory and cognitive function. The Aryuvedic herbalists also use it as a yogavaha, or synergistic enhancer of other herbal compounds.

 

Shilajit in supplement form:

 

Most of the studies on shilajit have been carried out in Asia, making that continent the expert source on this particular substance. Despite its remarkable health benefits  most in the West have never heard of it due to relative lack of interest on the part of western medicine. Several herbal companies and supplement manufactures have caught on to these powerfu health benefits and have made it available to everyone in western countries. Look for a pure form of this coming from the Himalayan region that has been tested for metals and cross contaminants.